Feb
09
2016

ADTRAN Supports Gigabit Broadband Adoption at Ohio Telecom Association Statehouse Day

This week ADTRAN is participating in the Ohio Telecom Association (OTA) Statehouse Day in Columbus, OH. The event brings together Ohio state legislators and service providers such as AT&T, CenturyLink, Frontier, Cincinnati Bell, Verizon, Windstream, ORBA, and more. ADTRAN is pleased to have the opportunity to share examples of the economic benefits Gigabit broadband is bringing to the residents, businesses and students of Ohio.

As a part of our Enabling Communities, Connecting Lives campaign, ADTRAN has been working with Ohio service providers to address the demand for ultra-fast broadband across the state. In fact, 15 school districts across Ohio are equipping schools with the speed and bandwidth needed to keep up with technology demands and comply with local education mandates. Gigabit broadband is also providing ample bandwidth to support the increased demand on Wi-Fi networks as Ohio schools see an increase in mobile devices from tablets, smartphones and other connected learning tools. Service providers are also using Gigabit broadband to address the needs of local business owners to successfully grow their businesses and stay competitive in a global marketplace.

ADTRAN believes every community regardless of its size can realize the transformative benefits of Gigabit broadband as it looks to compete  today’s digital economy. A few of the ways we see this happening are:

  • Economic Development: The availability of Gigabit throughout towns and cities has proven to attract new businesses, stimulating local economies. According to a Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) Council study, communities with widely available Gigabit broadband access experience a 1.1 percent higher per capita GDP than areas without Gigabit.
  • Education: Gigabit broadband is providing school districts with the necessary bandwidth to ensure online education for more personalized learning experiences as well as maximizing the benefit of E-rate funding projects. The technology is bringing networks together, allowing schools, administrators, teacher and students to communicate in new, innovative ways while learning at their own pace.
  • Real Estate: A FTTH Council study proclaims that communities with access to fiber-delivered Internet can increase home values by up to 3.1 percent, or nearly $5,500 on a median priced home of $175,000.
  • Telecommuting: Gigabit is opening the doors for increased work flexibility by allowing employees to work remotely. Telecommuters are able to enjoy a more affordable, higher quality of life without having to give up big city jobs. All the time saved in not commuting also translates to a lower carbon footprint.
  • Agriculture: The delivery of Gigabit speeds is helping streamline crucial agriculture processes as well as enable new services.
  • Healthcare: Hospitals and healthcare offices are deploying Gigabit broadband as they look to boost the quality of patient care. For those with ultra-fast broadband speeds, doctors, specialists and nurses are able to work efficiently with colleagues on-site and remotely.

Ohio is proving what we see in more than 250 communities across the country every day – Gigabit broadband is transforming communities and creating new opportunities in education, healthcare, real estate, transportation and more.

Author Gary Bolton is Vice President, Global Marketing at ADTRAN

garybolton 150x150 ADTRAN Supports Gigabit Broadband Adoption at Ohio Telecom Association Statehouse Day

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.adtran.com/adtran-supports-gigabit-broadband-adoption-at-ohio-telecom-association-statehouse-day/

Jan
15
2016

Valparaiso’s Creative District Advances to America’s Best Communities Semifinals

ADTRAN would like to congratulate Valparaiso, Indiana for being chosen as a semifinalist in the $10 million America’s Best Communities competition, sponsored by Frontier Communications, DISH Network, The Weather Channel and CoBank. The competition is designed to recognize and reward communities that demonstrate vision and entrepreneurial spirit, as well as a commitment to improve lives and stimulate their local economy. We’ve supported and counseled the city in the development of its Community Revitalization Plan and we’re very excited they had been chosen as one of the 15 semifinalists in the competition.

The city of Valparaiso’s plans involve developing an interactive Creative District to further cultivate community arts and culture activity. The Creative District will maximize new technologies, such as digital media, to make Valparaiso more dynamic, and will offer residents of all ages a special place to gather, interact and find meaningful work.

Valparaiso is creating downtown 300x179 Valparaiso’s Creative District Advances to America’s Best Communities Semifinalsa unique interactive cultural experience for the community and cultivating a strong community partnership among businesses, artists, students and more. The town has worked tirelessly to create an innovative and an impactful plan that its community will not only benefit from economically, but also enjoy. With our focus on enabling communities and connecting lives, we are incredibly proud of Valpo’s success and look forward to our continued partnership in the competition.

As a semifinalist, Valparaiso will attend the ABC Prize Summit April 26-27 in Durham, NC where they will present their plan to a panel of judges. From there, 8 finalists will receive an additional $100,000 to begin implementing their plans. In April 2017, the top 3 communities making the largest impact and showing the greatest potential for achieving sustained revitalization will be selected as the grand prize winners. The first place community will receive $3 million, second place will receive $2 million and $1 million for third place.

For more on America’s Best Communities and its Adopt-a-Community Program, visit www.americasbestcommunities.com.

Watch this video to see first-hand what this competition means to the town and its residents.

 

 

Gary Bolton is Vice President, Global Marketing at ADTRAN

 

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.adtran.com/valparaisos-creative-district-advances-to-americas-best-communities-semifinals/

Jan
04
2016

Monetizing Wi-Fi Part 3 – Application, Website Analytics and Social Media

Application and Website Analytics
Application and Website Analytics scour data around which websites people go to, which search terms they enter, which applications they use, which social media they engage in (and for how long), if they buy something, and other relevant data. It’s presented to the customer via user-friendly dashboards, notifications, reports, and APIs that interface with third party CRM, POS and advertising systems. This was originally designed for IT to be able to report on which websites and applications were being used on the network, firewall them – block or allow, bandwidth allocate them, and prioritize them with QOS but has since taken a central role in assessing the on-line behavior of a user on premise.

One of the many applications for Applications and Website Analytics is quantifying and embracing showrooming. Showrooming is the practice by shoppers examining merchandise in your store without purchasing it, while shopping elsewhere online with a mobile device to find a lower price. Application and Website Analytics bring you wide visibility into this practice allowing you to quantify the impact by analyzing things like the products your customers browse online, the search terms they use, and the social media they engage in, and at the same time embrace it by redirecting shopper’s mid-surf and offering price matching, faster delivery and onsite fulfillment.

Social Media
Instead of people entering their email address, filling out a form, creating an account with yet another username and password to remember during the user journey, you could use Social Media login options such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google to allow access to the Wi-Fi. Not only does this make for a great user experience for the end-user by allowing them to simply login with their social media channel credentials, the venue gets something in return. It is not a direct exchange of money but they can benefit from new likes, follows, posts, and tweets – social media exposure. More importantly, they get access to a whole wealth of information such as email address, demographics, likes, interests, etc. allowing the venue to deliver targeted content, ads, services and offers like never before.

Conclusion
Gone are the times of offering Wi-Fi internet access paid for by the end-user with a direct exchange of money or providing free Wi-Fi access with the hopes the incremental loyalty will offset the lost revenue. Consumers are demanding always on anywhere wireless internet access and they are expecting it for free. They see Wi-Fi as just another utility, like water and electricity. They expect it there, they expect it free and they expect it just to work. Venue owners and service providers alike must find new and innovative ways to monetize the Wi-Fi without the direct exchange of money such as, providing premium tiers of access, leveraging user journeys and location-based services as a platform to deliver targeted content, leveraging analytics and third Party CRM, POS and Advertising systems to provide that targeted content and finally leveraging social media channels as a new and exciting source of data to analyze.

About the author: Kenneth Fernandes has 17 years experience in networking and security. Since 2007, he has been focused totally on wireless networking and security. Kenneth currently serves as a Product Manager at ADTRAN where he oversees the wireless product lines such as the Bluesocket virtual Wireless LAN (vWLAN). Prior to joining ADTRAN through the acquisition of Bluesocket, Kenneth held several increasingly responsible positions with Bluesocket such as Principle ken f Monetizing Wi Fi Part 3 – Application, Website Analytics and Social MediaTechnical Support Engineer and most recently before acquisition,  Director of Customer Support. In addition, Kenneth has held positions with Vanguard Managed Solutions (formerly Motorola Multiservice Networking Division) and Motorola MND (contract). Kenneth is considered an “engineer’s engineer” by his peers and an authority on Wi-Fi technology. Based out of the Boston, Massachusetts area, Kenneth considers himself a Wi-Fi Enthusiast and is passionate about Wi-Fi. Follow him on Twitter at @wifiblogdotcom and at http://wifiblog.com/

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.adtran.com/monetizing-wifi-part-3-application-website-analytics-and-social-media/

Dec
22
2015

Monetizing Wi-Fi Part 2 – Presence Analytics and Indoor Location-based Services

Presence Analytics
When a Wi-Fi enabled device such as a smart phone or tablet comes within range of a wireless network, it sends a message called a probe request asking for the identity of the network. While probe requests are not used by most Wi-Fi networks if the client device does not associate or connect to the network, these simple transactions from un-associated client devices could yield important information. For example, probe requests could be analyzed to determine how many people are nearby or walking by (passersby), how long the passerby hangs out (dwell), if they come inside the location (visitors), how many passerby vs visitors (capture rate), how long a visitor hangs out (engagement) and if they are new or repeat visitors (loyalty). This brings the same type of metrics that are available to websites to brick-and-mortar facilities.

There are numerous applications for foot traffic or Presence Analytics and even more being thought of daily. For example, you could deliver relevant content, ads, services and offers to loyal visitors or visitors within proximity to something, determine effectiveness of new displays and marketing campaigns at a single site or across multiple and determine which sites or areas within a site are drawing the most traffic during which hours to staff accordingly.You can also determine which areas of a building are occupied for public safety in an emergency or perhaps determine which areas of a building are occupied for an energy control system to proactively control lighting, heating and air conditioning to reduce energy costs.

Indoor Location-based Services
We are all familiar with GPS providing turn-by-turn directions to help us navigate from one location to another. The problem is that GPS only works outdoors or within the coverage zone of a satellite. It doesn’t work well indoors. The solution is location-based services provided (LBS) by Wi-Fi. LBS can be used by mobile devices to provide turn-by-turn directions inside schools, hospitals, malls, hotels, casinos, convention centers, stadiums, airports, train stations, subways, coffee shops, etc. Targeted content from analytics data such as presence/location, proximity to surroundings, demographics, device/OS/browser type, websites/applications and social media likes and interests could be leveraged to influence where the user goes and to push content to them as they navigate. Further this analytics data could be combined with data from third party CRM, POS and advertising systems by leveraging APIs to deliver even more targeted content. Again, the more targeted the content, the more effective. Like user journeys, location based services are a great platform for targeted advertising and can help underwrite the cost of the installation and generate and on-going revenue stream.

Imagine getting turn-by-turn directions throughout a museum and each exhibit or art piece being explained on your mobile device. Imagine the exhibits and pieces you like influencing your journey throughout the rest of the exhibit. Imagine digital signage and music updating to match your tastes and preferences. Imagine being offered a special on your favorite wine as you walk by the restaurant. Imaging being offered a quick and easy seating upgrade if the VIP seats aren’t filled. LBS promises all this and more and future enhancements such as 802.11revMC and Angle of Arrival promise to make it more and more accurate over time.

 

About the author: Kenneth Fernandes has 17 years experience in networking and security. Since 2007, he has been focused totally on wireless networking and security. Kenneth currently serves as a Product Manager at ADTRAN where he oversees the wireless product lines such as the Bluesocket virtual Wireless LAN (vWLAN). Prior to joining ADTRAN through the acquisition of Bluesocket, Kenneth held several increasingly responsible positions with Bluesocket such as Principle ken f Monetizing Wi Fi Part 2 – Presence Analytics and Indoor Location based ServicesTechnical Support Engineer and most recently before acquisition,  Director of Customer Support. In addition, Kenneth has held positions with Vanguard Managed Solutions (formerly Motorola Multiservice Networking Division) and Motorola MND (contract). Kenneth is considered an “engineer’s engineer” by his peers and an authority on Wi-Fi technology. Based out of the Boston, Massachusetts area, Kenneth considers himself a Wi-Fi Enthusiast and is passionate about Wi-Fi. Follow him on Twitter at @wifiblogdotcom and at http://wifiblog.com/

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.adtran.com/monetizing-wifi-part-2-presence-analytics-and-indoor-locationbased-services/

Dec
17
2015

Monetizing Wi-Fi Part 1 – Premium Access and User Journeys

Introduction
Wi-Fi is now the preferred method of access to the network. More and more applications are moving to the cloud. Consumers are demanding always on anywhere wireless internet access and they are expecting it for free. They see Wi-Fi as just another utility, like water and electricity. They expect it there, they expect it free and they expect it just to work. This possesses a significant challenge for venue owners and service providers alike who were not that long ago, able to charge for Wi-Fi internet access in public venues and share in the revenue. Particularly for the venue owner, what was once a source of revenue has now become a cost. So what are the options for monetizing Wi-Fi without a direct exchange of money?

Premium Access
One of the trends we are seeing particularly in hospitality is a two tier, premium access model. A complimentary but limited service is available if you want to check your email and perform general web browsing like getting caught up on your social media networks. Then there is a simple way to upgrade to a paid service if you require more bandwidth intensive applications like streaming video or video conferencing. This is sort of like choosing between a normal guest room and a suite. One must tread carefully however as if the complimentary tier is so slow or restricted as to make checking email and general web browsing painful, you will likely cause more harm than good. No internet access is better than bad free internet access. On another other note if a person upgrades, they better be able to get the service promised and be able to stream video and video conference. Make sure you have enough bandwidth, that the complimentary tier works extremely well for checking email and general web browsing and that you have a way to allocate more bandwidth to the premium than the complimentary tier.

Another trend that’s emerging, particularly in public Wi-Fi such as airports and train stations, is to give a limited time usage for free, usually 15-30 minutes after which you pay. From an end user perspective, the same applies – if I am paying for the service, it better be good. This gives me the opportunity to try before I buy. From a venue or service provider perspective, it better be good or you aren’t making much revenue here.

While I realize this isn’t quite monetizing Wi-Fi without direct exchange of money, it is a happy medium where you could supplement some of the cost and justify the remainder with the fact that customers will come back, stay longer, and buy more. Although difficult to measure, the thought is, incremental loyalty will offset the lost revenue. This could also be combined with user journeys with advertisements to help offset even more lost revenue.

User Journeys
The user journey defines the step-by-step process that a Wi-Fi user walks through to attain Wi-Fi access. This might consist of a login page and a post-login page or something in between. Venues could monetize Wi-Fi by gathering data to analyze on these pages and provide relevant branding, content, ads, services and offers. Optional and mandatory fields such email address, age group and gender could be configured for data gathering or data could be obtained through Social Media login options such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google. Techniques such as http user agent could be leveraged to determine device type, OS and browser.

In its simplest form the user journey could be leveraged as a platform to provide general advertisements for example for the onsite restaurant or spa, third party advertisements, watch a video, download a coupon, or download an app before getting onto the Wi-Fi. In addition more targeted content could be delivered by leveraging analytics data like presence/location, proximity to surroundings, demographics, device/OS/browser type, websites/applications and social media likes and interests. Further this analytics data could be combined with data from third party CRM, POS and advertising systems by leveraging APIs to deliver even more targeted content. The more targeted the content, the more effective. For example if you were sitting in the stadium enjoying the game and you receive a notification from your mobile device indicating hot dogs were half off, that’s useful. If you receive notification that hot dogs are on sale at your local grocery store back home, that’s annoying.

Finally data gathered throughout the user journey for example the email address becomes an asset that could be leveraged for future marketing campaigns.

 

 

About the Author: Kenneth Fernandes has 17 years experience in networking and security. Since 2007, he has been focused totally on wireless networking and security. Kenneth currently serves as a Product Manager at ADTRAN where he oversees the wireless product lines such as thken f 150x150 Monetizing Wi Fi Part 1 – Premium Access and User Journeyse Bluesocket virtual Wireless LAN (vWLAN). Prior to joining ADTRAN through the acquisition of Bluesocket, Kenneth held several increasingly responsible positions with Bluesocket such as Principle Technical Support Engineer and most recently before acquisition,  Director of Customer Support. In addition, Kenneth has held positions with Vanguard Managed Solutions (formerly Motorola Multiservice Networking Division) and Motorola MND (contract). Kenneth is considered an “engineer’s engineer” by his peers and an authority on Wi-Fi technology. Based out of the Boston, Massachusetts area, Kenneth considers himself a Wi-Fi Enthusiast and is passionate about Wi-Fi. Follow him on Twitter at @wifiblogdotcom and at http://wifiblog.com/

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.adtran.com/monetizing-wifi-part-1-premium-access-and-user-journeys/

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